“Inch x Inch”, April 17, 2015 Exhibit

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Red Tree #2 14 x 16

Red Tree #2 14 x 16

Note: painting images seen in blogs may have sold. See currently available work at the portfolio.

An exhibit of artist Edd Enders’ was at Livingston’s prestigious Danforth Gallery through April 21st, 2015 with a reception on Friday the 17th at 6 pm and an open gallery day on Saturday the 18th, 2015. The title of the exhibit “Inch x Inch” is a reference to the fact that Enders builds and paints each canvas inch by inch and that the works’ fixed price was raised for the first time in years to $3.00 a square inch. A percentage of sales from this show will also benefit the Danforth Gallery, Livingston’s oldest gallery and champion of emerging and contemporary artists, a nonprofit organization that survives on donations gathered inch by inch.

 Yellowstone River Boat Ramp

Yellowstone River Boat Ramp

Livingston native Enders is a prolific painter who works nearly every day in his studio, not just painting, but handcrafting canvases. He builds canvases by stretching linen on wooden framework, impregnating them with a heated solution to protect the cloth from the caustic elements of linseed and oil paint, and often complements the work with custom built frames. This process and the materials allows light to bounce off the canvas making the paintings both luminescent and durable for decades to come. Enders makes contemporary paintings but uses age-old materials and processes. He invests a great deal of time and funds into the highest quality materials to complement the art he pours everything he has into.

Murder of Crows

Murder of Crows

Artists don’t often discuss their materials or process, or how sales make it possible for them to keep painting, but it is a ubiquitous reality. Ender’s art prices reflect the investment he makes in each painting’s highest quality materials without charging extra for his unique vision and talent. There are no prints of Enders’ work; each piece is a unique original and so their value as an art investment is only likely to increase. The Inch x Inch exhibit features many of Enders’ most popular tree images and the paintings range in size from 5 by 7 inches to 66 x 42 inches.

Cottonwood No. 198 32x48

Cottonwood No. 198 32×48

Enders has been painting the world around him, inch by inch, since 1989. “I paint human interaction with the environment; I am not interested in romanticizing the West.
While Montana has magnificent landscapes, none are without evidence of human impact,” says Enders. An avid outdoorsman who hunts, fishes, hikes and has a history as a hunting guide, wrangler and archeological surveyor, Enders is outside daily with his dog. “Every day I explore the outdoors and am struck by the visually stimulating way human imprints of roads, signs, telephone lines, fences, and vehicles intersect nature’s imagery of trees, rivers, sky, birds and the changing seasonal colors.” Painting is not just a pastime for Enders; it is his passion, his voice, his craft, his job. Here is a video walk through of the show, the colors are not accurate but it should whet your appetite to see the work in person. https://youtu.be/vGe_0op_B0o

For further information and more images of the exhibit’s paintings, contact business manager Kris King at buzzmemedia@gmail.com or 406/222-4848.

2014 Livingston Scenes

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Note: painting images seen in blogs may have sold. See currently available work at the portfolio.

Edd has been busy painting all fall, taking a day off here and there to hunt – it’s been a great year for game birds – and has a host of new canvases available. His recent work focuses on a range of in town and rural Livingston scenes. Phone 406/222-4848 to make an appointment to see Edd’s latest and greatest in person.

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Edd Returns from Art Exchange in China

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Livingston artists with Zhuping outside of Studio 188

Edd Enders has returned from two weeks in China full of gratitude. He went for a special art exhibit, exchange and group exhibition, “West on the Left, East on the Right,” in Shanghai with three other Livingston Montana artists; Parks Reece, Joe Fay and Abram Boise. They are the first four American artists represented by the international group, 188 Art who hosted their visit and showed the group various art studios and cultural and natural wonders in Shanghai and Jiangxi province as well as providing opportunities for the four artists to work in the 188 Art porcelain studio and do some plein air art.

Touring in China

Touring in China

The group art exhibition included twenty contemporary Chinese artists at 188 Art Studio in Shanghai and was well attended. The visit was in conjunction with the Yellowstone Asia Initiative, which brought an exhibit of contemporary artists from China to their only US showing in Livingston, Montana. As former Montana senator Max Baucus is now the Chinese Ambassador, it’s only natural to develop trade and cultural exchange ties between China and Montana and art is a universal language.

Edd discusses his work at the 188 Art exhibit

Edd discusses his work at the 188 Art exhibit

Enders sent twenty paintings to China, half to be kept in businessman and gallery owner Zhuping Yan’s Studio 188 art gallery’s permanent collection and the other ten for sale. Enders hopes they will resonate with Chinese art buyers and lovers. He very much admired the art by the many Chinese artists he saw on the trip, “The contemporary art was very high quality and I was especially impressed by the porcelain art. I was also happy to see work that addressed the environment.” Enders says it was a great, great learning experience and every day he encountered, observed and learned something new on the trip. Reflecting on the experience, he predicts, “All the art I saw and the visual stimuli will have a strong effect on my development as an artist.”

Chinese and Montana artists tour Jiangxi province

Chinese and Montana artists tour Jiangxi province

One of his favorite parts of the experience was being based in Shanghai and he enjoyed the city’s modernity, international flair, and the mix of modern and traditional architecture. He was also impressed by the hospitality they experienced, “people were fabulous; very courteous, generous, open, and seemed pleased to have us there.” He wishes he had been able to communicate with people more, as the language was a barrier. “The culture, language and environment are so different from any I’ve been exposed to,” Enders says. He enjoyed the cuisine and tried many dishes completely new to him and was fascinated by how the cuisine varied from region to region and how different it all was from stereotypical dishes found in American Chinese restaurants. He appreciated the affordability of the food and goods and often saw things in shops and restaurants he’d never seen before, so every day was a new learning experience.

Edd sketches in rural China

Edd sketches in rural China

Enders found Chinese gangster films and soap operas intriguing as well. While traveling inland to visit rural areas, he was fascinated as Shanghai’s modern conveniences, infrastructure and industrialization receded, “I didn’t see any mechanized farming; everything was being done by hand,” he observes. He was concerned about the air and water quality, especially the severity inland.

Enders concludes, “I am very grateful and appreciate the

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opportunity to experience China, learn about the culture, and especially the contemporary and traditional Chinese art forms which are so different than Western art.” He gives special thanks to Zhuping, Julie and the 188 Art staff, and the Chinese artists he met. Edd will be working with 188 Art to bring an exhibit of contemporary Chinese art to Livingston, Montana at the Danforth Gallery summer 2015.

East Meets West Art Exchange

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Edd meeting the 188 Art representatives in his Livingston Studio. They bought 10 paintings and chose 10 more to sell on commission.

Edd Enders visited China for two weeks in September, 2014, to participate in an art exchange and group exhibition in Shanghai with three other Livingston, Montana artists; Parks Reece, Joe Fay and Abram Boise.
They are the first four American artists represented by an international group, 188 Art, who will be hosting their visit and showing them various art studios and cultural and natural wonders in Shanghai, Shangrao and Jiangxi province as well as providing opportunities for the four artists to work in the 188 Art porcelain studio and do some plein air art.

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The highlight of the tour was the group exhibition with twenty contemporary Chinese artists at 188 Art and the opening ceremony on Tuesday, September 23rd in Shanghai. This visit is in conjunction with the Yellowstone Asia Initiative, which brought an exhibit of contemporary artists from China to their only US showing in Livingston, Montana. An “East meets West’ mural drawn by Parks Reece was also completed in Livingston this summer to commemorate the relationship.

muralCrop

Edd (on scaffold) and Parks work on the mural on the Livingston Civic Center

Edd Co-Curates Show at Danforth

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Noah Massey Painting

Noah Massey Painting

Shalene Valenzuela ceramics

Shalene Valenzuela ceramics

Edd Enders served on the Board of the Danforth Gallery, the oldest nonprofit art gallery in Livingston Montana, for many years. It celebrated its 40th year in 2014. In honor of this milestone, artists who have been involved with the Danforth for decades, “Legacy Artists”, like Edd, are curating shows. The first artwalk of the season June 28th, will be the opening reception for “Mingling Mediums Under the Big Sky” that Edd has co-curated with Traci Isaly.

Edd and Traci hang the show

Edd and Traci hang the show

Enjoy a diverse array of work from a group of vibrant emerging and established contemporary Montana artists specializing in mediums ranging from textiles, wood, ceramics, metals, glass, and paint to mixed mediums. The show includes: Patty Bobonich’s textiles, Vicki Fish’s mixed media work, Clare Anne Harff’s ceramics, Stacey Herries’s paintings, Elijah Isaly’s drums, Keegan Isaly’s woodwork, Jill Judd’s jewely, Jean Keffeler’s jewely, Noah Massey’s paintings, Katie Sissum’s glasswork, Shalene Valenzuela’s ceramics, and Suzi and Brian White’s sculpture (Ferrous Wheel Design.) The work will be up through July 19th at the Danforth Gallery, 106 North Main Street. Summer hours are Tuesday through Friday between 10 am and 5:30 pm and Saturday from 12pm-4pm. For more information visit http://www.pcfadanforth.org or call 222-6510.

Edd on Film

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Did you know that Edd Enders has been part of several films? He inspired a feature project by Montana State University film student Heather Adkins entitled Edd Enders – Montana Oil Painter that captures his style, process, studio, philosophy and even canine sidekick Jade perfectly. The short film is four and a half minutes long but says so much!

An earlier film by photographer Audrey Hall begins with Edd painting in his studio and visits a range of other area folks to end with Edd painting the local landscape just filmed. See You Then was a finalist in the 2009 Nikon Film Festival and runs 2 minutes. 

Thanks to these talented filmmakers for capturing Edd in action!

http://eddendersart.com/film/

The Painter’s Paint

edd's art process
Edd's palette

Edd’s palette

What paint does Edd Enders paint with? His canvases are exclusively painted with oils rather than water-based acrylics. That’s because oil paint’s binder, linseed oil, is translucent. He says, “When you see a lot of acrylic paintings they look flat because their binder is plastic and it absorbs light but when light goes through the oil paint on a canvas; it bounces off the primer and is luminous. Dutch masters Rembrandt and Vermeer’s paintings are good examples of that luminosity.” Oils also lasts and lasts.

Did you know that oil paints in tubes last for decades when not exposed to oxygen? Most of the paints Edd uses were given to him by people who had collections of oil paints and didn’t end up using them. For instance, a few years ago Edd got a letter from a fellow he knew in high school who had boxes of oil paints from the 1960’s and he gave the collection to Edd. When painting with these 50+ year old oils, Edd says, “I have to be very careful squeezing the tubes because the metal is so oxidized that my fingers can go right through the tubes. But the paint is perfectly fine and the colors unaffected.”

When you buy an oil painting from Edd, it should last for generations.